Doubling ETS tax acceptable to Minister but not to Kiwis

Barry Brill’s sharp analysis brings the ridiculous, unsustainable logic of the Hon Nick Smith under a scrutiny it cannot weather — and that’s without even mentioning the absence of scientific support for the theory of dangerous anthropogenic global warming. What warming? What sea level rise? The sooner John Key’s cabinet realises how Key and Smith have been leading them a nonsensical climatic dance around our trading image and the chance to make a quick buck from trading in the empty-headed, vaporific “carbon credits” the sooner we can eliminate the expensive bureaucratic carbon footprint we’ve acquired for reporting our Kyoto compliance (this press release first published on Scoop).

Press Release: New Zealand Climate Science Coalition

Friday, 16 September 2011, 11:01 am

“The Caygill Review’s recommendation for doubling the current emissions trading scheme (ETS) energy levy over the next three years may be acceptable to the Minister for Climate Change, but it is certainly not acceptable to the people of New Zealand,” said the Hon Barry Brill, chairman of the New Zealand Climate Science Coalition.

“The Government’s constant refrain has been that New Zealand will not try to be a world leader and that Kiwis will never be forced to do more than their ‘fair share’ in reducing emissions,” said Mr Brill.

“But what’s ‘fair’ about the ETS?”

  • No other country has an ETS on petrol.
  • No other country has an ETS on the diesel used for key export industries.
  • No other country’s ETS covers the transport sector – “a tax on everything”.
  • No other country has considered putting an ETS on food production and farming.
  • No other country has an ETS on methane, ozone and nitrous oxide.
  • No other countrty has an ETS which increases the price of ALL electricity.
  • No other country has enacted an ETS since 2004.
  • No other country outside of Europe has EVER enacted an ETS.

“New Zealand was not only the first country in the world to enact a national ETS, we are also the only country to have one now, in 2011,” said Mr Brill. “We were world leaders all right – but nobody followed.”

“The Government’s excuse for the legislation in 2009 was our huge future liability under the Kyoto Protocol. We now know that the protocol will expire next year and won’t be repeated. The review found a ‘dominant view that international uncertainty would prevail’ in the foreseeable future.

“Hon Nick Smith says he is ‘calibrating New Zealand’s approach relative to our key trading partners’. Can this be true? USA, China, Japan, Canada and South Korea have all considered and rejected a national ETS. That leaves Australia – where an electorate which voted against carbon pricing might (or might not) have a temporary tax imposed by a single vote.

“Opinion polls here and elsewhere have recorded a constant erosion of support for climate policies. In most democracies, the views of the majority are respected.

“Carbon trading is in disarray all over the globe. The Chicago market is bankrupt, the European market is beset by endless scandals, and sub-prime credits are flooding into the New Zealand market,” said Mr Brill.

“At the same time, the received wisdom paraded as ‘the science’ is flummoxed by the fact that there has been no global warming this century, and its frayed paradigm is under real threat.”

“New Zealand is struggling to recover from a long recession, while coping with the Christchurch earthquakes. This is not the time for doubling energy taxes,” concluded Mr Brill.

Ends

4 Thoughts on “Doubling ETS tax acceptable to Minister but not to Kiwis

  1. Australis on September 17, 2011 at 2:28 pm said:

    The absurdity of the Government’s justification is highlighted when it is remembered that New Zealand’s GHG emissions are only 0.1% of the global total, and that it would not make a blind bit of difference to future temperatures if New Zealand ceased to exist.

    The sole reason New Zealand has an ETS at all is to “keep up with the Joneses”. PM Key says we might suffer reputational damage if we don’t “do our fair share”.

    Key should read this post. The Joneses were only talking a good game – they don’t actually have ETS statutes. The only Jones that does have something (the EU) has so many holes that it is not even a decent figleaf.

    How embarassing for little, remote, naive New Zealand!

  2. Clarence Kay on September 17, 2011 at 2:45 pm said:

    The EU ETS is confined to a few very large industries, which only compete with each other within the EU. The only sector which has any impact on mainstream business or households is electricity generation.

    All generators were given huge amounts of free credits at the commencement of Stage 1 in 2005. There were so many of them that they flooded the market and their value fell to zero by 2007. Generators made unprecedented profits.

    Another swathe of free credits was issued to generators at the beginning of Stage 2 in 2009. Some claimed they weren’t fully covered and sought approval from regulators to pass on ETS costs to households. Regulators all over Europe arrived at similar conclusions – the ETS had not yet imposed any net costs on the electricity sector.

    It’s all a sham. Pure spin. The soaring rhetoric of politicians about saving the planet doesn’t need to be matched any actual sacrifices by the people who vote for them.

  3. Huub Bakker on September 17, 2011 at 3:47 pm said:

    Will no one rid me of this troublesome Tax? (Sorry Shakespeare)

    The answer for me is simple. I will be voting for a party that promises to repeal the ETS come November 26th.

  4. This is my comment on Brian Fallow’s Herald article

    I’m glad to see you mention the HFC-23 scam. This has been known for a while now but very few MSM journalists mentioned it.

    Europe is hanging on a precipice. Greece is close to default, and the entire EU edifice may come crumbling down. NZ will be left with this ETS beast which serves no good other than to transfer our wealth to developing nations. We need to get out now.

    (21 likes)

    http://www.nzherald.co.nz/business/news/article.cfm?c_id=3&objectid=10751778

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